The Latest

Dec 16, 2013 / 79 notes

mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRISTO GEOHEGAN: I was painfully unsure. At first I wanted to be a musician, but I couldn’t play an instrument to save my life. Then I wanted to be an actor, but ‘Waiter’ in my school play was about as far as that dream went. And then for the longest time I became obsessed with anthropology, which I guess has been very much incorporated into my interest in the subject matter and people I photograph. Ultimately I just wanted to grow up. I’m not so sure I’m even there yet.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CG: What I’m really inspired by at the moment is the rate at how news reporting and media consumption is evolving and expanding. We’re starting to see new technology and a rise in citizen journalism breaking and eclipsing the formulaic mode of news coverage we’d grown accustomed to. As a content maker I think it’s a really fascinating period to be a part of.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CG: I’m in the midst of researching a couple of projects that are vastly different to what I’ve done in the past. Which is exciting and incredibly terrifying. But right this second I’m just sat around hoping that no one in this cafe has realised I’ve just been sat on melting chocolate for the past hour.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CG: I wouldn’t say that I’ve had specific mentors, but I’m continually inspired by people I meet along the way. I have a real affinity for people with a real drive and passion in what they do; they remind me why I do what I do and why I should keep going. And I’m also a massive Phillip-Lorca diCorcia fanboy.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CG: I’m based in London and living here is like being in the transit area of some massive airport. I don’t think there are many places that can offer you the ability to meet people from so many different corners of the world like London can; being immersed in such a multicultural city is really important to me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CG: Take your tutors advice as a guideline and not gospel. Your integrity is worth more than any grade.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CG: I’d say that 90% of the work that I do before taking on a photographic project is research. And my love of photography stems from an intrinsic desire to learn more about the world and the people within it. So as long as I’m still working towards that goal, I don’t mind which medium or manner I’m doing it in.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CG: If you’d asked me that question a year ago, I’d probably tell you not really. But in the past year I’ve been very fortunate to work with the wonderful guys over at Boat Magazine, and it’s been such a refreshing experience for someone like me who has worked entirely alone for the vast majority of their career. It’s entirely changed my work ethic. Having people around you to use as a sounding board lets you see things from a viewpoint different from your own, which is invaluable.

Dec 16, 2013 / 55 notes

mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARK DORF: I wanted to be hundreds of different things growing up - I was interested in everything really. I was always tinkering and taking something apart or putting it back together which I think reflected my desire to dissect and understand even at a young age. More specifically I can distinctly remember the age old desire to be an Astronaut. The sense of mystery and unknown was, and still is for that matter, so overwhelmingly attractive. I think though that I fulfill a lot of desire to explore the unknown in my current creative practice.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: Right now I am finding inspiration in the internet and the amazing way in which technology grows to help aid us in our daily lives.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Right now I am working on a set of animations for my newest body of work //_PATH.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: I had the incredible opportunity to work with the collaborative photographic artists Kahn+Selesnick for a summer while I was still a student at the Savannah College of Art and Design. To this day Nicholas Kahn and Richard Selesnick are still some of my best friends and I would absolutely consider them mentors of mine. The taught me so much not only about process and creating works, but also how to live as a creator.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: I am currently based in Brooklyn, NY. Since moving here it has certainly changed quite a bit about my work and my process as does every environment that one lives in. Previously I lived in Hudson, NY so I had immediate access to the landscape that I love to work with. I could get in my car and in ten minutes be in the middle of the Catskill Mountains. Here in Brooklyn that is obviously not the case so I have been traveling out from Brooklyn to landscapes that I want to explore. What has been most interesting is the way the people that I meet have affected my interests. Every day you meet someone doing something new that is different from your own practice and even further you can then make efforts to further explore those ideas for the most part through primary sources given the size and population of NYC. There is just such an insane amount of knowledge to be had here — my head has grown such an appetite.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Find a job that not only benefits you financially, but also in production of your work. Find a job that gives you tools in addition to a paycheck. You can’t not make work.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: What plan B?

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: Community is always important. To have a group of peers that you can converse with and exchange ideas with is an invaluable situation.

Dec 4, 2013

9 METER

Oct 17, 2013

Julie Taymor: Spider-Man, The Lion King and life on the creative edge

Oct 15, 2013 / 58 notes
Oct 15, 2013 / 37 notes

thecreatorsproject:

Kaleidoscope + The Italian National Gymnastics Team = THIS

Oct 4, 2013 / 10,383 notes
Sep 30, 2013 / 1,034 notes

Dynamics, asthetics and sensuality aren’t simply features of dance, but furthermore those of the “Motion Theater”. A theater that combines modern elements with classical ones in order to add suitable significance to this magical art. The logo intertwines the dancers movements and their connections to the theater, so that it appears to be “in motion” at all times. The dancer, their moves and the music create a new sphere due to their everlasting dependence on one another. It seems as if they originate from the theater. Therefore, the logo (on posters) arises in immediate incorporation to the dancer. The expression of the dance as “movement in space” is enforced by elements such as the “floating” typography.

(via typographie)

Sep 30, 2013 / 4,747 notes
Sep 24, 2013 / 5,112 notes

archatlas:

Fashion in Leaves Tang Chiew Ling