The Latest

littletexts:

— Carson McCullers
Aug 28, 2014 / 15,991 notes

littletexts:

— Carson McCullers

(via time-bomb-baby)

thecreatorsproject:

Artist JR Shakes Up The Dance World With Immersive New Installation
Jan 29, 2014 / 113 notes
Jan 29, 2014 / 195 notes

thecreatorsproject:

[Premiere] Her: Love In The Modern Age 

Her: Love In The Modern Age, chronicling reactions to Spike Jonze’s Oscar-nominated film, Her. The documentary, directed by Lance Bangs, features stories and reflections from writers, musicians, actors and contemporary culture experts, including Olivia Wilde, James Murphy and Bret Easton Ellis, on the film Her, and their thoughts on love in the modern age.

artchipel:

Kilian Schoenberger - #294 | Morning Mist

Christine Peace turned 3 today! :)
Jan 6, 2014 / 402 notes

artchipel:

Kilian Schoenberger - #294 | Morning Mist

Christine Peace turned 3 today! :)

Jan 2, 2014 / 3,907 notes
Dec 16, 2013 / 1 note
artchipel:

Caras Ionut - View of the world
Dec 16, 2013 / 446 notes
artchipel:

Caras Ionut - Water world girl
[found at sosuperawesome]
Dec 16, 2013 / 565 notes
artchipel:

Carmelo Blandino | on Tumblr - UNITY. Acrylic on canvas, 60”x48”
Dec 16, 2013 / 3,255 notes

artchipel:

Carmelo Blandino | on Tumblr - UNITY. Acrylic on canvas, 60”x48”

Dec 16, 2013 / 79 notes

mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRISTO GEOHEGAN: I was painfully unsure. At first I wanted to be a musician, but I couldn’t play an instrument to save my life. Then I wanted to be an actor, but ‘Waiter’ in my school play was about as far as that dream went. And then for the longest time I became obsessed with anthropology, which I guess has been very much incorporated into my interest in the subject matter and people I photograph. Ultimately I just wanted to grow up. I’m not so sure I’m even there yet.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CG: What I’m really inspired by at the moment is the rate at how news reporting and media consumption is evolving and expanding. We’re starting to see new technology and a rise in citizen journalism breaking and eclipsing the formulaic mode of news coverage we’d grown accustomed to. As a content maker I think it’s a really fascinating period to be a part of.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CG: I’m in the midst of researching a couple of projects that are vastly different to what I’ve done in the past. Which is exciting and incredibly terrifying. But right this second I’m just sat around hoping that no one in this cafe has realised I’ve just been sat on melting chocolate for the past hour.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CG: I wouldn’t say that I’ve had specific mentors, but I’m continually inspired by people I meet along the way. I have a real affinity for people with a real drive and passion in what they do; they remind me why I do what I do and why I should keep going. And I’m also a massive Phillip-Lorca diCorcia fanboy.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CG: I’m based in London and living here is like being in the transit area of some massive airport. I don’t think there are many places that can offer you the ability to meet people from so many different corners of the world like London can; being immersed in such a multicultural city is really important to me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CG: Take your tutors advice as a guideline and not gospel. Your integrity is worth more than any grade.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CG: I’d say that 90% of the work that I do before taking on a photographic project is research. And my love of photography stems from an intrinsic desire to learn more about the world and the people within it. So as long as I’m still working towards that goal, I don’t mind which medium or manner I’m doing it in.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CG: If you’d asked me that question a year ago, I’d probably tell you not really. But in the past year I’ve been very fortunate to work with the wonderful guys over at Boat Magazine, and it’s been such a refreshing experience for someone like me who has worked entirely alone for the vast majority of their career. It’s entirely changed my work ethic. Having people around you to use as a sounding board lets you see things from a viewpoint different from your own, which is invaluable.